From flunk out to university lecturer: a success story

Whether you have one class or all of them, you can take it as a sign to catch other dreams, or just call it quits at all. But wait, because we've got some advice on how to reorganize those courses that were for the first time

In addition, you will hear from Andy Burazin, a lecturer at the University of Toronto Mississag, who has left the university to get a doctorate in Applied Matemate. So jump back in the loop, SLNer, and demonstrate that this class hasn't seen the last of you

Find out what (or not) to motivate you

It's very hard to stand up and try again when you don't have the right motives. Andy was just like, "I wouldn't want it if it was," what if? " moment. "I am not a change," she says

Your motives, on the other hand, may be more complicated than that. A good exercise is to ask yourself what a big goal you have. What do you really want to do?

This may take a while, but unlike what they told you in school, you don't have to figure out and make a decision right now

But what motivates you to succeed and to prosecute. If this is not a school or your current program, it may be time to consider another path

What's your real problem?

So, if you decide what you want, you'll think about what might have caused the first time. You made an effort? You went to class and made a statement? You asked for help? Do you understand the material?

(ALL) " My parents were very strict-I love them to death, but they were old school. When I went to university, I just didn' t know how to control myself, and I didn' t understand the notion of freedom, so I blew a lot of my courses. "

For Andy, it was her lack of discipline and time management, which was why she was kicked out of the university in the first year. "I missed the classes and didn' t do my job," she explains. " My parents were very strict-I love them to death, but they were old school. When I went to university, I just didn' t know how to control myself, and I didn' t understand the notion of freedom, so I blew a lot of my courses. "

It's not just admitting you screwed up, but it's the first step

"Okay, I screwed up, how do I fix it?"

If you do not know from history, you will be condemned to repeat it. You must make some changes to ensure that you do not make the same mistakes again. Consider:

When she went back to school, Andy made a schedule for herself and actually sat down and did a job. "I studied for tests two to three weeks ahead, actually, I learned so much that I would sell this night before the test, just to calm myself," she explains

Reapply (self)!

Find out what requirements must be met to get what you want and go after it. It will be determined to devote itself to this

If you need to iterate over a course, make sure there are no restrictions or limitations that prevent you from registering again. Check the prerequisites, and while you are on it, you can get the time to become familiar with the prerequisites that will help you understand the new things

If you get kicked out of the university, you can try to appeal the decision, just like Andy, though, as for her, it might not work. In this case, you will understand how long you have been kicked out, and use this time to prepare for the moment when you write your applications. Consider whether you will reuse this program in the same school or try to use a similar program in another institution. Check the application process and get documents, portfolios, and other materials ready to work when the gateways are open

Andy's recommendation to female students, how is she?

" Continue and do not quit. Nothing in life is easy, and while some people are on a silver platter, most of us don't. Oh, and find out you're passionate about making you go "yes," I want to do it! When you wake up in the morning. If the cart is in a shopping cart, it is the best thing to do. Just find something that makes you alive. "

* Views expressed in respect of the author, and not necessarily for the "Student life" or their partners

Rebecca Tunney is studying anthropology at the University of Toronto in Mississauga. She is an ambitious writer, a vocalist, when necessary, a cupcake and a jack of all trades, but teaching something